facebook / people / mic

People magazine very recently ran a story about a Las Vegas victim that was everything but true. It was heartbreaking, sitting on the edge of your seat, tons of feels, you name it… but again it just wasn’t true.

The story was about a man named Larry Parra, who was terminally ill and it claimed that he was one of the 58 victims of the Las Vegas mass shooting last weekend. Don’t believe me? Check out the Google Cached version here.

From that story… “Larry Parra was terminally ill and on dialysis, but a close friend tells PEOPLE he was still happy on Sunday as he headed to an outdoor country music festival in Las Vegas to see Jake Owen, his “favorite artist.”

He was fulfilled,” says Jason Rogers, 56, Parra’s best friend of 25 years. “He really just wanted to live his life.

“Rogers, who used to live with Parra in Las Vegas, says he moved to Minnesota in February but came back to Nevada for four days to celebrate Parra’s 40th birthday.”

Including the killer, 59 people died in that tragedy. The interesting thing to note, however, is that the Clark County Coroner’s office has stated that the families of the 58 other people killed have been identified… and Parra is not one of them.

Folks over at Mic broke the story… here’s more from their article:

Mic reached out to both Rogers and Anderson on Facebook to request more information and clarification about the man identified as Parra in the photo on People, but did not receive a response.

When reached by phone Thursday, Rogers said he was unable to talk, saying he was at work. He said to call back in a half-hour. When a Mic reporter called back, he did not answer. He later blocked that Mic reporter’s phone number.

“People is investigating this story,” a spokesperson for the magazine said in a statement. “In the meantime, we have removed it from our site.”

People’s story comes in the wake of hoax news stories and fake news in the aftermath of the Las Vegas shooting.

On Wednesday, Newsweek retracted an article about the girlfriend of the shooter, saying in an editor’s note that the magazine mistakenly thought that public records of two different people identified the same person.

Leave a Comment

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.