Things Get “Sticky” For Florida Couple After Amazon Order Mishap [Video]


A couple in Orlando ordered some storage bin off Amazon and after they opened the package and got a whiff of a VERY strong odor they discovered a HUGE surprise…

Inside what they thought were empty storage containers was, in fact, 65 pounds of marijuana… you know, that sticky icky! Gah, if I got to explain the joke, it’s not funny! OK, so it wasn’t my best… moving on!

“We love Amazon and do a lot of shopping on Amazon,” said one of the customers, who wants to remain anonymous, according to WFTV9, a local ABC affiliate. “They were extremely heavy, heavier than you would think from ordering four empty bins.”

I personally do not partake but this was just really funny to me. What would you have done? Would you have called the cops or your buddy who could move this amount of drugs?

As reported by WFTV:

When she and her fiancé needed to put some things in storage, they placed an order for 27-gallon storage totes.

But when the packages arrived, they knew something didn’t feel right.

“They were extremely heavy, heavier than you would think from ordering four empty bins,” she said.

The marijuana was in boxes inside the totes and as soon as they opened the boxes, they were hit with a strong odor.

“When the first officer got here, she was in disbelief,” the customer said.

[…]

Police seized the drugs and launched an investigation.

It had been shipped by Amazon’s Warehouse Deals via UPS from a facility in Massachusetts.

It weighed 93.5 pounds.

“We were still pretty fearful our home would be broken into, and we didn’t sleep there for a few days,” said the customer.

The couple said that after going back and forth with Amazon mostly by email for more than a month, they never spoke to a supervisor.

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