Gary Brandwein, a retired New York City teacher, believes that his former high school Stuyvesant High School is still a “hotbed” of leftover toxins as a result of it’s proximity to the Ground Zero.

The teacher retired in 2002 after surviving a stroke and suffering from arrhythmia. It should be noted that a large number of faculty members at Stuyvesant have died of lung cancer as a result of exposure to these toxins.

Brandwein’s claims come in response to lawyer Michael Barasch announcement Thursday that he is representing 12 graduates from different schools near the 9/11 attacks who allegedly have cancer or lung diseases as a result.

And that’s not all, many other health conditions have been reported and it’s believed to be as a result of the same event.

As reported By Carl Campanile and Danika Fears for New York Post:

“I worked at Stuyvesant from 1984 to 2002. Of a faculty of 135, 25 have died of cancer within ten years,” said Gary Brandwein, 77, citing an unconfirmed tally. “Mostly women, with breast and ovarian cancer, two men with brain cancer and several with melanoma.”

Brandwein retired in June 2002 after suffering from arrhythmia, or irregular heartbeat, and later survived a stroke.

“This is a lifetime grievance for me,” he said, responding to a Post story about how at least a dozen young adults who went to school near the World Trade Center have battled 9/11-related cancers and lung diseases.

“The school should never have been reopened four weeks later. The whole World Trade Center was disassembled and brought to barges 150 yards from the school.

“Everyone wanted to be a patriot,” Brandwein added.

He said one chemistry teacher died of brain cancer in the wake of the terror attacks, and Richard Geller, a math teacher for 29 years, died of skin cancer in November of 2011. Teachers under the age of 55 have also died of breast and ovarian cancers, he added.

 

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