A new report states that some major American foundations have given millions in funding to several organizations which have ties to terrorist organizations and radical “Religion of Peace” groups.

I.S.W. is one such group and has even been banned by some countries for allegedly funding Hamas, among other groups. They’ve received, according to the report, millions of dollars in charities like the GE Foundation.

The various foundations, with at least seven covered in the report, have given more than $5,000,000 to these seven groups since 2000, according to IRS filings with the bulk of that being donated since 2008.

As reported by Peter Hasson for The Daily Caller:

In total, 46 corporate foundations, eight community foundations, nine private foundations and one donor-advised fund have given money to these seven groups. 

The MEF researchers tried — with very limited success — to privately persuade every foundation on the list to cease giving money to the seven groups, before sharing their findings exclusively with TheDC. In the interest of transparency, TheDC included the entire list of donations — with accompanying documentation — at the bottom of this article.

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The foundations funding the seven radical groups fall into four categories: corporate charities, community foundations and independent foundations and donor-advised foundations.

Independent Foundations: Soros And Gates Lead The Way

George Soros’ Open Society Foundations and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation have combined for more than $2 million in donations to at least one of the seven groups since 2011.

OSF gave $625,000 to ISNA between 2011 and 2015.

OSF sent a lengthy answer in response to questions about ISNA’s ties and OSF’s financial support of the group:

The Islamic Society of North America is one of the largest mainstream Muslim organizations in the United States. The group runs youth leadership programs, promotes efforts to improve the governance of mosques, promotes gender inclusivity, and works with members of the Catholic and Jewish communities on interfaith programs, among other activities. The group’s leadership has partnered with the FBI, the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Defense in Democratic and Republican administrations alike to make the country safer. And they’ve joined State Department-sponsored travels abroad to promote the benefits of U.S.-style democracy.
Unfortunately, the organization has long been a favorite target of extremist anti-Muslim hate groups, who continue to circulate discredited information in an effort to stain their good reputation. The Open Society Foundations is proud to support ISNA’s work on the Shoulder to Shoulder Campaign, an interfaith effort to stand up against hate crimes and anti-Muslim bigotry.

The Gates Foundation gave more than $1.3 million to Islamic Relief Worldwide in 2014. The Gates Foundation, which did not reply to a message seeking comment, told the MEF researchers that they currently have no plans for future donations to Islamic Relief, but refused to commit to not funding Islamic Relief in the future.

Corporate Foundations: Intel, GE, Johnson & Johnson, Verizon and more. 

GE Foundation gave more to groups on the list than any other corporate foundation — more than $537,000. That money went to Islamic Relief (both the worldwide organization and its U.S. affiliate) and ICNA.

A spokesperson for GE said that, after reviewing Islamic Relief Worldwide, the company will no longer be giving money to the group.

“We regularly review the charities we support to certify compliance with IRS 501(c)(3) status or equivalent for non-U.S. organizations as well as the U.S. Patriot Act, and determined Islamic Relief Worldwide did not meet these standards,” a spokesperson for GE said.

GE will, however, continue funding Islamic Relief USA, the group’s sister organization in the United States.

 

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