David Meade is the “Christian numerologist” who said that the world was supposed to end last weekend… if you’re reading this it probably didn’t.

He’s now coming out saying that the “calculations” were off… didn’t we hear this same crap from that Harold dude? Anyway…

“It is possible at the end of October we may be about to enter into the seven-year Tribulation period, to be followed by a Millennium of peace.”

“When Nibiru is on close approach to Earth sometime during the Tribulation, you’ll have solar flares and a possible loss of the electrical grid for weeks, maybe longer.”

“However, that’s the main risk I see right now because, as I’ve stated in my book, right after the initial solar flare risk I see the Rapture of the true Church.”

As reported by Express.co.uk:

Mr Meade still maintains the solar eclipse on August 21 was the sign the end is nigh and Nibiru, otherwise known as Planet X or Wormwood, will appear in the skies on September 23.

He states: “The September 23, 2017 Great Sign of the Woman in Revelation 12:1-5 is the starting point for this calculation. It’s a once-in-human-history event locked in by God Himself.

“The solar eclipse on August 21st was a scriptural sign of God’s judgment on our nation and judgment came swiftly afterward.”

As reported by The Daily Wire:

NASA quickly shot down the notion that “Planet X” is on a collision course with Earth.

“Various people are ‘predicting’ that (the) world will end Sept. 23 when another planet collides with Earth,” NASA said. “The planet in question, Niburu, doesn’t exist, so there will be no collision.”

Meade based his “calculations” on different bible verses but apparently neglected to read Matthew 24:36 which states, “But about that day or hour no one knows, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father.”

 

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