Officer Conrad Lariviere, of Springfield Massachusetts, is facing disciplinary action after he posted “Hahaha love this” on his Facebook page in regards to a story he saw about the car that struck protesters at the “Unite the Right” rally over the weekend. He later apologized, saying in a Facebook conversation with Masslive.com that he’s a “good man who made a stupid comment.”

What an idiot…

As reported by Yahoo! News:

Springfield Police Commissioner John Barbieri said he received a complaint about the comment Sunday.

“I took immediate steps to initiate a prompt and thorough internal investigation,” Barbieri said via email. “If in fact this post did originate from an officer employed with the Springfield Police Department, this matter will be reviewed by the Community Police Hearings Board for further action.”

Democratic Mayor Domenic Sarno denounced the comments.

“There is no place for this in our society, let alone from a Springfield Police Officer,” Sarno said in a statement.

Lariviere had written on Facebook: “Hahahaha love this, maybe people shouldn’t block road ways.”

He was responding to a story about the death on Saturday of 32-year-old Heather Heyer, who was struck by a car that plowed into a crowd of people protesting the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. Nineteen others were injured. James Alex Fields Jr., 20, of Ohio, was arrested shortly after and charged with second-degree murder.

Lariviere also questioned whether the driver of the car that struck the crowd was a “nazi scumbag.”

He responded to a critic who asked whether he had ever been struck by a car, saying he had been struck by someone “with warrants, but who cares right you ignorant brat live in a fantasy land with the rest of America while I deal with the real danger.”

Lariviere told Masslive.com he is not a racist.

Leave a Comment

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.