Three People Busted for Buying Signatures From Skid Row Bums


Three people were arrested after they were caught paying bums a dollar or less to sign a petition to get a ballot initiative onto the November ballot. The initiative is to roll back a new law, doing away with bail depending on the person’s risk, which you know it really means everyone, especially illegal aliens. The three were charged with felony voter fraud charges.

“Yet another arrest by your @LAPD_RESET officers for Election Code Fraud. Three people booked on Felony charges. Homeless individuals were getting paid $1.00 or less for a forged signature on a State ballot measure.”

From The Blaze

Los Angeles police arrested three people on felony election fraud charges for paying $1 or less to homeless people on Skid Row in exchange for their forged signatures, the Sacramento Bee reported, citing a Friday tweet from LAPD Capt. Marc Reina.

The signatures went on a petition to get a referendum on the California state ballot to overturn a 2018 law that replaced California’s cash bail system with a system granting pretrial release based on public safety and flight risk assessments, the paper said, citing Reina. The referendum was cleared for signature gathering earlier this month, according to a news release from California Secretary of State Alex Padilla.

Who are these signature gatherers working with?

Reina told the Bee that police don’t yet know if the signature gatherers are affiliated with lobbying groups pushing the referendum but that homeless people are sometimes asked to forge more than one voter’s name on petitions.

There has been no word on whether the three petition gatherers worked for the group that is pushing the initiative or a hired service.

The views and opinions expressed here are solely those of the author of the article and not necessarily shared or endorsed by SteadfastAndLoyal.com

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.