Haha so… someone dressed as The Monopoly Man took an interesting turn in protest of the latest Equifax hearing.

He appeared just behind Richard Smith, the Equifax CEO, during his hearing to the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. Hoping to troll the CEO during his Q and A session about the recent security breach that left millions of Americans private data up for grabs by hackers.

The troll in question is Public Citizen’s Amanda Weaver, and she stopped to talk to the media, explaining that she hoped to demonstrate against forced arbitration clauses, like the one Public Citizen claims Equifax tried to use to indemnify itself when it asked customers to waive their right to sue the credit company in order to receive free credit monitoring services.

Antifa, take note. If you want to really make a statement and get noticed and not labeled as a gang or terrorist organization this is how you do it!

As reported by Emily Zanotti for The Daily Wire:

After the hearing, the Monopoly Man — actually, technically a Monopoly woman, Public Citizen’s Amanda Weaver — stopped to talk to media. She explained that the demonstration was a protest by Americans for Financial Reform and Public Citizen against forced arbitration clauses, like the one Public Citizen claims Equifax tried to use to indemnify itself when it asked customers to waive their right to sue the credit company in order to receive free credit monitoring services.

Lawyers later said the Equifax clause would not prohibit customers from launching a class action lawsuit.

According to Weaver, companies like Equifax are pushing to rollback a Consumer Financial Protection Bureau rule that prohibits these secret indemnification clauses. The House voted to kill the rule last month. The Senate will vote on a similar rule later in the 2017 session.

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