Cory Booker Can’t Even Win Support in New Jersey


If polls taken in his own state is any indication, Cory Booker running for president has the same chance of winning as a Shetland pony has of winning the Kentucky Derby. More people in his own state believe he would be a terrible president than thinks he would be a good one.

Of Garden State residents polled by Monmouth University between Feb. 8-10, only 37% thought he would be a good president as opposed to 42% who said he would be bad. Another 58% say he cannot be an effective Senator and presidential candidate at the same time. That puzzles me because he is already ineffectual and he really isn’t running yet.

He’s declared, just not campaigning.

From The Conservative Tribune

“The history of our nation is defined by collective action; by interwoven destinies of slaves and abolitionists; of those born here and those who chose America as home; of those who took up arms to defend our country, and those who linked arms to challenge and change it,” Booker said in his announcement video.

“Together, we will channel our common pain back into our common purpose. Together, America, we will rise.”

Booker’s campaign probably thought that sounded stirring. For Americans who follow politics — even for liberals — it’s more boringly predictable Democratic identity politics.

Even aside from the notable lack of enthusiasm among his own state’s residents, Booker is facing stiff competition in the nomination race.

California Sen. Kamala Harris, one of Booker’s Democratic opponents in the nomination race , already seems in the lead with regard to media coverage.

Harris had a successful town hall with CNN last month, which rewarded her with early momentum.

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