Donna Brazile Reveals How She Felt About Seth Rich [Video]


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Donna Brazile appeared on “Make It Plain” with SiriusXM host Mark Thompson and spoke a bit about the murder of Seth Rich.

In July of 2016 Seth Rich was shot and killed in Washington D.C. as he was making his way home on foot. The police believe that it was a robbery gone wrong but due to Seth’s work in the DNC many conspiracy theories

And Brazile, former chair of the Democratic National Committee, at one point pondered if the Russians had something to do with Rich’s death.

“Only to [her friend] Elaine could I say that I felt some responsibility for Seth Rich’s death. I didn’t bring him into the DNC, but I helped keep him there working on voting rights,” she wrote. “With all I knew now about the Russians’ hacking, I could not help but wonder if they had played some part in his unsolved murder. Besides that, racial tensions were high that summer and I worried that he was murdered for being white on the wrong side of town.”

So while talking to Mark Thompson she revealed the guilt she felt about what had happened. Brazile said, “He was my child. I loved him. He worked in the voting rights division, I was the vice chair over that division. He was one of two staff people. I love him, I miss him. He was a patriot. And I hope to God we find out who murdered Seth Rich.”

Emotionally she said, “I have been in politics all my adult life, the only children I have are the children that I have hired. They’re my children.”

While she may not speak about it more publicly, I’d lay odds that she still wonders about the “what ifs” surrounding young Seth Rich’s death.

Regardless of this theory or that theory, it’s clear that his death shook her in a very real way. I do hope she’s able to find some peace.

 

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