Eric Swalwell Wants to Investigate Trump’s Finances But He is Deeply in Debt


Eric Swalwell wants to investigate the finances of President Trump, but despite getting a huge pay increase from being a state legislator to his current $174,000 a year. But despite the pay raise, Swalwell reported that he owed between $50,000 in student loan debt, the same amount he listed eight years ago.

Is he paying that down? Someone should investigate. In 2013, he cashed in his retirement fund that had between $15,001 and $50,000 and still racked up credit card bills to between 10,001 and $15,000 with American Express and between $10,001 and $15,000 with Chase Bank. And this is a man running for president that wants to control the country’s finances?

From Fox News

The congressman also didn’t disclose any real estate in his possession. According to the Washington Free Bacon, Swalwell is currently renting a four-bedroom townhouse in Washington, D.C.

The presidential candidate has been repeatedly mocked over his failed attempts at humor, grandstanding and relentless pushing of the idea that President Trump or his campaign colluded with Russia.

Earlier this month, Swalwell was ridiculed after stumbling over his knowledge of the Constitution in a bid to score political points and complaining that the Constitution doesn’t mention “woman”. Many pointed out that “Man” is also not mentioned in the Constitution.

Earlier this year, the congressman was scorned after he bravely bypassed a café inside the Trump Tower and opted out to find another coffee spot in New York City.

“It’s snowing in New York,” he wrote in a tweet. “I need coffee. The closest cafe is inside Trump Tower. This is me walking to an alternative.”

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