Credit: Gage Skidmore

We had a chance to take Obamacare out of our lives even last summer… but John McCain in his misguided “wisdom” chose to continue to allow it to live. Now, premiums are expected to jump 15% in 2018 according to current projections.

That’s right! He just won’t shot it down, folks. He was one of a handful of Republicans who were pointed at during the most recent failure of repealing the failed Affordable Care Act.

As Written by Monica Showalter for the American Thinker:

Market uncertainty is rampant among insurers, fearful that $705 billion in subsidies for buyers may not be replenished by Congress and that either Obamacare’s buyers or else they themselves will have to eat that cost.

Meanwhile, the CBO projects that two million consumers will be knocked out of the market by the 15% higher cost, leaving the remaining consumers to pick up the tab – meaning that another price hike should be well in the works.

At the same time as this spiraling cost nightmare is going on, the Free Beacon reports that 63 counties next year are projected to have no Obamacare provider – all of the insurers have “gone Galt” and pulled out due to skyrocketing costs and the inability to cover them.  Another 1,472 counties are projected to have just one provider, so take it or leave it.  Those recipients, incredibly, must still pay the fine even if there is no coverage to buy, despite talk in Congress of exempting them from that.

Can a system this bad be stopped?  Sure, the way a car crash is stopped, through momentum.  Eventually, it will just stop.  Price hikes and uncovered counties can go on only so long until the whole system fails.  Such a path takes a lot of people down with it before the wheels finally stop spinning.

THERE IS MORE HERE, KEEP READING:

Blog: Thanks to McCain, Obamacare premiums to rise 15%, 63 counties to lose coverage in 2018

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