credit: Gage Skidmore

Donald Trump managed to pull off what seemed like the impossible, at least if you listened to mainstream media. He got the right people in the right places to cast a vote for the right candidate.

Be it Republicans and Conservatives who backed him, Democrats who wanted Bernie and were absolutely #NeverHillary, and heck the list could go on.

Now, a recent focus group of those voters located in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and Michigan may give an indication that he has lost or is in risk of losing a good portion of his 2016 supporter base.

Now… we here at Steadfast and Loyal aren’t so sure about this. You see, a lot of young Democrats who really didn’t bother to get involved in the Presidental election have been coming out in droves to out-vote Republicans in local elections.

Couple that with the fact that this focus group was conducted by Jim Messina, a former Obama campaign manager, well… it’s clear that there’s bias here.

One thing I do know, however, is that come 2020 you need to expect the Dems own “silent majority” to come out against Donald Trump. We need to be ready for that. The rest of our “silent majority” who remained silent needs to be ready to back up the 2020 Trump re-election.

As reported by Susan Wright for Town Hall:

It was a former Obama campaign manager, Jim Messina, who put together the focus group.

“The white Obama-Non-Clinton voters we surveyed were clear: If the economy does not improve measurably, they are not going to give Trump a second chance—and they already have a clear reason to explain his failure: Twitter,” Messina explains in a Politico op-ed.

“The members of our focus groups worried that Trump was so pre-occupied with picking Twitter fights and the general chaos of his administration that he was not focusing on making the economy better,” he added.

They’re not the only ones who have expressed concerns over President Trump’s inability to act as if his intellect is at least, to some degree, advanced beyond that of a 13-year old mean girl on social media.

Given the threats and very real concerns our nation faces, we need more than childish name-calling and pouty, juvenile rants from our president.

Messina went on to explain the findings of the group.

“When exposing all voters in the survey to a tough message laying out the consequences of Trump’s tweeting—how it signals what he really cares about and prevents him from focusing his energy on making good on his promises to improve people’s lives—we found that the overall rating of Trump’s handling of the economy dropped by 6 points,” Messina wrote.

Calling an enemy leader “Little rocket man” or “short and fat” on Twitter isn’t a confidence booster. Who knew?

“Perhaps even more interesting is that when we re-surveyed Obama-non-Clinton voters six weeks later, those who’d been exposed to the tweeting message had a much dimmer view of Trump than those exposed to other messages,” he added.

Messina went on to point out that what has worked before, won’t always be the case.

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