Former Press Secretary Sean Spicer Lands a New Gig


Since his resignation weeks ago, Spicer has been offered quite a few gigs, even some television gigs. But he’s decided, now, has taken a job with a D.C. law firm.

Spicer famously resigned as press secretary on July 21 when Anthony Scaramucci was brought in as communications director. After The Mooch was fired after 10 days, Spicer didn’t decide to return, having already been presented with some interesting post-White House opportunities.

As reported by The Daily Wire:

Former White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer has landed a new gig — and no, it does not involve a lick of sub-par televised ballroom dancing. According to The New York Post, the former White House staffer who resigned a mere two weeks ago has landed a position at D.C. law firm Williams & Connolly.

“Attorneys Bob Barnett and Michael O’Connor, both of whom work at the firm, have represented a myriad of politicians and television personalities, such as Fox News’ Neil Cavuto, Brit Hume, and Steve Doocy; NBC News’ Andrea Mitchell, Brian Williams, and Cynthia McFadden; as well as CNN’s Christiane Amanpour,” notes The Blaze.

And if that doesn’t take the cake! He was offered a slot on “Dancing With The Stars”.

As reported by The Blaze:

ABC also offered Spicer a slot on “Dancing With the Stars,” which he ultimately turned down.

Now, just two weeks after Spicer’s resignation, the former White House press secretary has a new job at a prominent Washington, D.C., law firm.

The Post reported that Spicer accepted a position at Williams & Connolly. Attorneys Bob Barnett and Michael O’Connor, both of whom work at the firm, have represented a myriad of politicians and television personalities, such as Fox News’ Neil Cavuto, Brit Hume, and Steve Doocy; NBC News’ Andrea Mitchell, Brian Williams, and Cynthia McFadden; as well as CNN’s Christiane Amanpour.

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