© Pascal Mannaerts / www.parcheminsdailleurs.com / CC BY-SA 3.0

Karma might be real… Madonna, who threatened to blow up the White House, announced not too long ago that she was moving out of America… good riddance.

Now it seems that her latest album, a live recording of her “Rebel Heart” tour, didn’t even sell 4,000 copies. Let that sink in…

As reported by Emily Zanotti for The Daily Wire:

Of course, it’s not to say that Madonna isn’t still a money-maker. Her Rebel Heart tour grossed the singer $169.8 million worldwide and drew more than a million people. The album in question is a recording made of her performance at Allphones Arena in Sydney, Australia, which drew thousands.

But that also doesn’t mean that Madonna is the kind of commercial success she once was. Drawing audiences, awash in ’80s and ’90s nostalgia to major arenas is different than selling music, and Madonna is clearly having trouble with the latter. The album that inspired the tour, Rebel Heart, sold only 238,000 copies — better than the live album, but still pretty miserable for even a washed-up superstar.

[…]

After her controversial statement, Madonna took to Instagram to try and backtrack it saying…

“However I want to clarify some very important things. I am not a violent person, I do not promote violence and it’s important people hear and understand my speech in its entirety rather than one phrase taken wildly out of context,” Madonna continues.

“I spoke in metaphor and I shared two ways of looking at things — one was to be hopeful, and one was to feel anger and outrage, which I have personally felt,” Madonna explains.  “However, I know that acting out of anger doesn’t solve anything. And the only way to change things for the better is to do it with love.”

The 58-year-old concludes her statement, “It was truly an honor to be part of an audience chanting “we choose love”.”

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