Hogg Wants a National Tax on Gun and Ammo Sales, He’s Just 101 Years Too Late


Who says David Hogg is slow? Well, me for one. He is now proposing a federal tax on guns and ammunition. Had he checked, he might have found out that such a tax was enacted in 1917.

There is one difference…

Hogg’s plan would use the money to try and figure out why criminals use guns. (Duh! Cause that’s why they are criminals) The 1917 law said that the money would go to -preserve game so that hunting would continue to be good. Maybe we should tax stupidity. If Ocasi-Cortez though rent was high, what do you imagine she would think of her tax bill?

From Breitbart News

The NRA-ILA reports that Hogg’s idea is at least 100 years old, as it was pushed via the Firearms and Ammunition Excise Tax in 1917. The difference? That tax was pushed, and implemented, as a way to fund pro-hunting causes, not anti-Second Amendment campaigns.

Certain cities–Chicago, Seattle, and Detroit–have adopted a tax on guns and/or ammunition for the very purposes espoused by Hogg. Ironically, Chicago homicides rose once the tax was in place, and Fox News reports that Seattle saw violence rise after their tax was passed. Detroit’s tax was passed too recently to see the results, but since gang members and street criminals do not buy their guns at retail, where the tax is exacted, there is no reason to think the Motor City’s tax will fare better than in Chicago or Seattle.

One thing a gun violence tax does do is make the cost of self-defense firearms prohibitive for poorer citizens in Democrat-controlled cities. And such citizens often live in neighborhoods where they may need a gun simply to survive.

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