CNN’s Jim Acosta owns Himself on Border Report


Jim Acosta has been owned by almost everyone in Washington. That long list just got one name longer, Jim Acosta. Acosta was making a report from the border between Mexico and Texas near the McAllen border crossing.

As he stood in front of a steel wall, he declared that he could see no sign of a crisis and there were no illegals rushing the border. It was a classic own. Think about it a moment. Acosta is on the border where there are steel slats constituting a border wall.

Acosta said:

“We’re not seeing any imminent danger. There are no migrants trying to rush toward this fence. No sign of the national emergency the president has been talking about.”

Gee, Jim, you mean where we have built a border wall, there is no crises? Gee, whoda ever thunk it? Acosta owned himself and in tennis, this is known as an unforced error. The only thing his report shows is that a border wall works. The thing is, he isn’t even smart enough to know what he did.

From The Daily Caller

CNN’s Jim Acosta traveled to the U.S.-Mexico border in McAllen, Texas, on Thursday to cover the presidential visit to the border town. As Acosta awaited the president, he took a selfie video walking along the border, and inadvertently made a case for the construction of a border wall.

In the video, Acosta wanders around steel slats on the border, describing how “tranquil” it is.  “I found some steel slats down on the border. But I don’t see anything resembling a national emergency situation,” Acosta tweeted.

“We’re not seeing any imminent danger,” Acosta said in the video. “There are no migrants trying to rush toward this fence. No sign of the national emergency the president has been talking about.”

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