Chicago Police Release Jussie Smollett’s Files…Texts With Brothers


The release of the texts between Smollett and the Nigerian brothers, Abimbola and Olabinjo Osundairo, and they are very damning for Smollett. There are texts where Smollett asked the brothers to score drugs for him. Then he sent them a text requesting a face to face meeting.

The brothers say at that meeting, Smollett asked them to fake an attack against him and told them to say  “Empire f****t” and “Empire n****r” while beating him up. It has also been discovered by documents found with this release is that prosecutors were old to lay off Smollett weeks before he was eventually released.

From The Blaze

In the months leading up to the incident, Smollett exchanged texts with Abimbola and Olabinjo Osundairo seeking to purchase drugs from them, including ecstasy, marijuana, and cocaine. Smollett paid them for the drugs using PayPal and Venmo.

A conspicuous message occurred in January when Smollett texted them “Might need your help on the low. You around to meet up and talk face to face?”

After that message, Smollett picked up one of the brothers and drove to their apartment. Police say they conducted a practice run of the hoax assault the next morning, and that Smollett told them to call him “Empire f****t” and “Empire n****r” while beating him up.

Smollett allegedly paid the brothers $3,500 by check and wrote that the check was for a nutrition and fitness program.

The documents released by Chicago PD also detail how uncooperative Smollett was during the investigation, refusing to look at photos of potential suspects and refusing to turn over his phone or submit to DNA testing.

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