Tech Giant Microsoft Is Going To Decide What You Should Find Offensive


Colin / Wikimedia Commons / CC BY-SA 4.0

In their “infinite wisdom” Microsoft has decided to decide what you should find offensive.

According to their new service agreement, they’re going to ban accounts that use “offensive language” and will even go through private data to “investigate” end-users.

This should worry you, especially since most of us use a Microsoft product in one form or another…

It was released this month, the tech giant warned customers using Office, Xbox, even Skype and other products that the company will be prohibiting offensive language and inappropriate content starting May 1st.

Microsoft provided a summary of the changes; number 5 reads:

In the Code of Conduct section, we’ve clarified that use of offensive language and fraudulent activity is prohibited. We’ve also clarified that violation of the Code of Conduct through Xbox Services may result in suspensions or bans from participation in Xbox Services, including forfeiture of content licenses, Xbox Gold Membership time, and Microsoft account balances associated with the account.

“Don’t publicly display or use the Services to share inappropriate content or material (involving, for example, nudity, bestiality, pornography, offensive language, graphic violence, or criminal activity),” Microsoft warns in a portion of their new codes of conduct.

They also added a bit about “investigating” it’s users who are accused of violating this new policy: “When investigating alleged violations of these Terms, Microsoft reserves the right to review Your Content in order to resolve the issue,” the new policy states.

So what’s the big deal? Well… what exactly will qualify as “offensive language”? The last time that was attempted, I recall a bunch of banning going on all over social media, don’t you?

It’s vague and shaky ground and heck… it’s just not right. Who are they to decide what their users find offensive? Aren’t BLOCK buttons still a thing? I know they are… Well, that part falls under Code of Conduct Enforcement, which states, “When investigating alleged violations of these Terms, Microsoft reserves the right to review Your Content in order to resolve the issue.”

They did add: However, we cannot monitor the entire Services and make no attempt to do so.”

But does that really make you feel better?