New Report Reveals Clinton Campaign Was Pushing For A “President” Trump


A new book says that those in the Hillary campaign were talking up Trump because they believed he would be the easiest candidate to beat.

Well, they got their wish but it morphed into a nightmare. In fact, I seriously doubt anyone else could have beaten her. To make matters worse for the Democrats, by 2020 President Trump could be unbeatable. If North Korea denuclearizes it could even be a landslide.

“Chasing Hillary: Ten Years, Two Presidential Campaigns, and One Intact Glass Ceiling,” is set for release on Tuesday. The book was written by a writer for the New York Times.

Other stories in the book include the time Hillary exploded when she heard that Joe Biden was thinking about getting into the race. If he had, he would have taken more Hillary voters than he would have Sanders’ voters.

But Biden decided not to run because “You guys don’t understand these people. The Clintons will try to destroy me.”

The Daily Beast reported:

An agenda for an upcoming campaign meeting sent by [Campaign Manager] Robby Mook’s office asked, ‘How do we maximize Trump?’” Chozick writes, describing a time when the GOP primary was still crowded.

Even as Trump surged in the polls, the Clinton camp still saw him as a danger to stronger candidates rather than such a candidate in his own right, Chozick reports, so that in August 2015, “when the main GOP debate came on, everyone pushed their pizza crust aside and stared transfixed at the TV set… [Campaign Manager] Robby [Mook] salivated when the debate came back on and Trump started to speak. ‘Shhhhh,’ Robby said, practically pressing his nose up to the TV. ‘I’ve gahtz to get me some Trump.’ Robby thought Rubio would be the nominee. Podesta was bullish on Kasich. Bill and Hillary, still stuck in the 1990s, feared the Bush surname most of all.”

By the time of the conventions, though, as Trump was selected as the Republican nominee, the Clinton campaign was still trying to figure out how to improve her negative favorability ratings.